Authors

Stefanopoulou E; Grunfeld EA.

Title

Mind-body interventions for vasomotor symptoms in healthy menopausal women
and breast cancer survivors. A systematic review.

Source

Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology. 38(3):210-225, 2017 Sep.

Abstract

Mind-body therapies are commonly recommended to treat vasomotor symptoms,
such as hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS). The purpose of this
systematic review was to evaluate the available evidence to date for the
efficacy of different mind-body therapies to alleviate HFNS in healthy
menopausal women and breast cancer survivors. Randomized controlled trials
(RCTs) were identified using seven electronic search engines, direct
searches of specific journals and backwards searches through reference
lists of related publications. Outcome measures included HFNS frequency
and/or severity or self-reported problem rating at post-treatment. The
methodological quality of all studies was systematically assessed using
predefined criteria. Twenty-six RCTs met the inclusion criteria.
Interventions included yoga (n=5), hypnosis (n=3), mindfulness (n=2),
relaxation (n=7), paced breathing (n=4), reflexology (n=1) and cognitive
behavioural therapy (CBT) (n=4). Findings were consistent for the
effectiveness of CBT and relaxation therapies for alleviating troublesome
vasomotor symptoms. For the remaining interventions, although some trials
indicated beneficial effects (within groups) at post-treatment and/or
follow up, between group findings were mixed and overall, methodological
differences across studies failed to provide convincing supporting
evidence. Collectively, findings suggest that interventions that include
breathing and relaxation techniques, as well as CBT, can be beneficial for
alleviating vasomotor symptoms. Additional large, methodologically
rigorous trials are needed to establish the efficacy of interventions on
vasomotor symptoms, examine long-term outcomes and understand how they
work.

 

 

Authors

Ben-Josef AM; Chen J; Wileyto P; Doucette A; Bekelman J; Christodouleas J;
Deville C; Vapiwala N.

Title

Effect of Eischens Yoga During Radiation Therapy on Prostate Cancer
Patient Symptoms and Quality of Life: A Randomized Phase II Trial.

Source

International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics.
98(5):1036-1044, 2017 Aug 01.

Abstract

PURPOSE: A randomized phase II study was performed to measure the
potential therapeutic effects of yoga on fatigue, erectile dysfunction,
urinary incontinence, and overall quality of life (QOL) in prostate cancer
(PCa) patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy (RT).

METHODS AND MATERIALS: The participants were randomized to yoga and
no-yoga cohorts (1:1). Twice-weekly yoga interventions were offered
throughout the 6- to 9-week courses of RT. Comparisons of standardized
assessments were performed between the 2 cohorts for the primary endpoint
of fatigue and the secondary endpoints of erectile dysfunction, urinary
incontinence, and QOL before, during, and after RT.

RESULTS: From October 2014 to January 2016, 68 eligible PCa patients
underwent informed consent and agreed to participate in the study. Of the
68 patients, 18 withdrew early, mostly because of treatment
schedule-related time constraints, resulting in 22 and 28 patients in the
yoga and no-yoga groups, respectively. Throughout treatment, those in the
yoga arm reported less fatigue than those in the control arm, with global
fatigue, effect of fatigue, and severity of fatigue subscales showing
statistically significant interactions (P<.0001). The sexual health scores
(International Index of Erectile Function Questionnaire) also displayed a
statistically significant interaction (P=.0333). The International
Prostate Symptom Score revealed a statistically significant effect of time
(P<.0001) but no significant effect of treatment (P=.1022). The QOL
measures had mixed results, with yoga having a significant time by
treatment effect on the emotional, physical, and social scores but not on
functional scores.

CONCLUSIONS: A structured yoga intervention of twice-weekly classes
during a course of RT was associated with a significant reduction in
pre-existing and RT-related fatigue and urinary and sexual dysfunction in
PCa patients.

 

 

Authors

Harris RE; Ichesco E; Cummiford C; Hampson JP; Chenevert TL; Basu N; Zick
SM.

Title

Brain Connectivity Patterns Dissociate Action of Specific Acupressure
Treatments in Fatigued Breast Cancer Survivors.

Source

Frontiers in neurology [electronic resource].. 8:298, 2017.

Abstract

Persistent fatigue is a pernicious symptom in many cancer survivors.
Existing treatments are limited or ineffective and often lack any
underlying biologic rationale. Acupressure is emerging as a promising new
intervention for persistent cancer-related fatigue; however, the
underlying mechanisms of action are unknown. Our previous investigations
suggested that fatigued breast cancer survivors have alterations in brain
neurochemistry within the posterior insula and disturbed functional
connectivity to the default mode network (DMN), as compared to
non-fatigued breast cancer survivors. Here, we investigated if insula and
DMN connectivity were modulated by self-administered acupressure by
randomizing breast cancer survivors (n=19) to two distinct treatments:
relaxing acupressure or stimulating acupressure. All participants
underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the posterior insula
and functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and
immediately following 6weeks of acupressure self-treatment. As compared to
baseline measures, relaxing acupressure decreased posterior insula to
dorsolateral prefrontal cortex connectivity, whereas stimulating
acupressure enhanced this connectivity (p<0.05 corrected). For relaxing
but not stimulating acupressure, reduced connectivity was associated with
sleep improvement. In addition, connectivity of the DMN to the superior
colliculus was increased with relaxing acupressure and decreased with
stimulating acupressure, whereas DMN connectivity to the bilateral
pulvinar was increased with stimulating and decreased with relaxing
acupressure (p<0.05 corrected). These data suggest that self-administered
acupressure at different acupoints has specificity in relation to their
mechanisms of action in fatigued breast cancer survivors.

 

 

Authors

Ozdelikara A; Tan M.

Title

The Effect of Reflexology on Chemotherapy-induced Nausea, Vomiting, and
Fatigue in Breast Cancer Patients.

Source

Asiapacific Journal of Oncology Nursing. 4(3):241-249, 2017 Jul-Sep.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Patients receiving chemotherapy struggle with the side effects
of this treatment. These side effects obligate the patients to use not
only the pharmacological methods but also non-pharmacological relaxing
methods. This study was conducted to determine the effect of reflexology
on chemotherapy-induced nausea, vomiting, and fatigue in breast cancer
patients.

METHODS: The study was conducted as a pretest-posttest experimental
design. The study was conducted with sixty patients, thirty as the control
and thirty as the experimental groups. A sociodemographic form, Rhodes
index of nausea, vomiting, and retching (INVR), and Brief Fatigue
Inventory (BFI) were used to collect the data. Analysis of variance,
t-test, percentage calculations, and Chi-square methods were used to
evaluate the data. The data obtained were assessed using the "Statistical
Package for Social Science 21.0" software.

RESULTS: It was determined that the difference between the total mean
scores of INVR in the experimental and control groups was significant on
the onset and first and second measurements, and the difference between
total mean scores of development and distress between the groups was
statistically significant in the third measurement (P < 0.05). The results
of the study showed that the BFI mean scores of patients in the
experimental group gradually decreased in the first, second, and third
measurements (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS: The present study proved that reflexology decreased the
experience, development, distress of nausea, vomiting, and retching as
well as fatigue in the experimental group. Hence, the use of reflexology
is recommended for chemotherapy-induced nausea, vomiting, and fatigue.