Authors

Sharifi Rizi M; Shamsalinia A; Ghaffari F; Keyhanian S; Naderi Nabi B.

Title

The effect of acupressure on pain, anxiety, and the physiological indexes of patients with cancer undergoing bone marrow biopsy.

Source

Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 29:136-141, 2017 Nov.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to determine the effect of acupressure on pain intensity, anxiety, and physiological indexes of patients with cancer undergoing bone marrow biopsy and aspiration.

METHODS: The study was designed as a randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial. Ninety samples was selected using the convenience sampling method, then for allocation groups random block sampling was used (30 for each group). The three groups were similar by age and gender. LI4 and HT7 (Shen Men) acupressure points were examined for the intervention. Sham pressure was used in the placebo group while no intervention was applied in the control group.

RESULTS: The results showed that the lowest average anxiety score (1.5 +/- 0.5; P = 0.01) and the lowest average pain score (4.9 +/- 0.8) after the intervention were related to the acupressure method (P = 0.001).

CONCLUSION: Cost effectiveness and short-term simple education make acupressure method useful in clinical settings for different illnesses.

 

 

Authors

Gregoire C; Bragard I; Jerusalem G; Etienne AM; Coucke P; Dupuis G; Lanctot D; Faymonville ME.

Title

Group interventions to reduce emotional distress and fatigue in breast cancer patients: a 9-month follow-up pragmatic trial.

Source

British Journal of Cancer. 117(10):1442-1449, 2017 Nov 07.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Long-term effects of psychosocial interventions to reduce emotional distress, sleep difficulties, and fatigue of breast cancer patients are rarely examined. We aim to assess the effectiveness of three group interventions, based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), yoga, and self-hypnosis, in comparison to a control group at a 9-month follow-up.

METHODS: A total of 123 patients chose to participate in one of the interventions. A control group was set up for those who agreed not to participate. Emotional distress, fatigue, and sleep quality were assessed before (T0) and after interventions (T1), and at 3-month (T2) and 9-month follow-ups (T3).

RESULTS: Nine months after interventions, there was a decrease of anxiety (P=0.000), depression (P=0.000), and fatigue (P=0.002) in the hypnosis group, and a decrease of anxiety (P=0.024) in the yoga group. There were no significant improvements for all the investigated variables in the CBT and control groups.

CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that mind-body interventions seem to be an interesting psychological approach to improve the well-being of breast cancer patients. Further research is needed to improve the understanding of the mechanisms of action of such interventions and their long-term effects on quality of life.

 

 

Authors

Carlson LE.

Title

Distress Management Through Mind-Body Therapies in Oncology.

Source

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs. 2017(52), 2017 Nov 01.

Abstract

Distress is highly prevalent in cancer survivors, from the point of diagnosis through treatment and recovery, with rates higher than 45% reported worldwide. One approach for helping people cope with the inherent stress of cancer is through the use of mind-body therapies (MBTs) such as mediation, yoga, hypnosis, relaxation, and imagery, which harness the power of the mind to affect physical and psychological symptoms. One group of MBTs with a growing body of research evidence to support their efficacy focus on training in mindfulness meditation; these are collectively known as mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs). Research supports the role of MBIs for dealing with common experiences that cause distress around cancer diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship including loss of control, uncertainty about the future, fears of recurrence, and a range of physical and psychological symptoms including depression, anxiety, insomnia, and fatigue. Growing research also supports their cost-effectiveness, and online and mobile adaptations currently being developed and evaluated increase promise for use in a global context.

 

 

Authors

MacLeod J; Wolff E; McAllister A; Mao JJ; Garland SN.

Title

Including the Patient Voice in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research in Integrative Oncology.

Source

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs. 2017(52), 2017 Nov 01.

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to describe our experience as patient advisors as we work on a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded project, CHoosing Options for Insomnia in Cancer Effectively (CHOICE). The CHOICE Study is a comparative effectiveness trial comparing acupuncture with cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in cancer survivors. We describe the composition of the patient advisory panel, the patient engagement process, and our contributions throughout the study, and we highlight some of our successes so far. Our motivation to contribute to the research process and our hopes for the future of patient-centered outcomes research are discussed.

 

 

Authors

Zia FZ; Olaku O; Bao T; Berger A; Deng G; Yin Fan A; Garcia MK; Herman PM; Kaptchuk TJ; Ladas EJ; Langevin HM; Lao L; Lu W; Napadow V; Niemtzow RC; Vickers AJ; Shelley Wang X; Witt CM; Mao JJ.

Title

The National Cancer Institute's Conference on Acupuncture for Symptom Management in Oncology: State of the Science, Evidence, and Research Gaps.

Source

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs. 2017(52), 2017 Nov 01.

Abstract

The Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine, at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) held a symposium on "Acupuncture for Cancer Symptom Management" on June 16 and 17, 2016. Invited speakers included 19 scientists and scholars with expertise in acupuncture and cancer research from the United States, Europe, and China. The conference reviewed the NCI's grant funding on acupuncture, analyzed the needs of cancer patients, reviewed safety issues, and assessed both the current scientific evidence and research gaps of acupuncture in oncology care. Researchers and stakeholders presented and discussed basic mechanisms of acupuncture; clinical evidence for specific symptoms; and methodological challenges such as placebo effects, novel biostatistical methods, patient-reported outcomes, and comparative effectiveness research. This paper, resulting from the conference, summarizes both the current state of the science and clinical evidence of oncology acupuncture, identifies key scientific gaps, and makes recommendations for future research to increase understanding of both the mechanisms and effects of acupuncture for cancer symptom management.

 

 

Authors

Yun H; Sun L; Mao JJ.

Title

Growth of Integrative Medicine at Leading Cancer Centers Between 2009 and 2016: A Systematic Analysis of NCI-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center Websites.

Source

Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Monographs. 2017(52), 2017 Nov 01.

Abstract

Background: Cancer centers have increasingly offered integrative medicine therapies in response to their patients' unmet needs. We evaluated the growth of integrative medicine in leading academic cancer centers in the United States as reflected by their public-facing websites.

Methods: We performed a systematic review of 45 National Cancer Institute (NCI)-designated comprehensive cancer center websites. Two researchers independently evaluated whether the websites provided information regarding integrative medicine modalities and, if so, whether the services were provided in the same health system. They compared the proportion of cancer centers providing the information on each modality in 2016 with the data from the prior study in 2009.

Results: The most common integrative medicine therapies mentioned on the 45 NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center websites were exercise (97.8%) and acupuncture and meditation (88.9% each), followed by yoga (86.7%), massage (84.4%), and music therapy (82.2%). The majority of the websites also provided information on nutrition (95.6%), dietary supplements (93.3%), and herbs (88.9%). The most common therapies offered in the health systems were acupuncture/massage (73.3% each), meditation/yoga (68.9% each), and consultations about nutrition (91.1%), dietary supplements (84.4%), and herbs (66.7%). Compared with 2009, there was a statistically significant increase in the number of websites mentioning acupuncture, dance therapy, healing touch, hypnosis, massage, meditation, Qigong, and yoga (all P < .05).

Conclusions: Leading US cancer centers increasingly present integrative medicine content on their websites, and the majority of them provide these services to patients in the same health systems.

 

 

Authors

Cheng CS; Chen LY; Ning ZY; Zhang CY; Chen H; Chen Z; Zhu XY; Xie J.

Title

Acupuncture for cancer-related fatigue in lung cancer patients: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial.

Source

Supportive Care in Cancer. 25(12):3807-3814, 2017 Dec.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing symptom that is the most common unpleasant side effect experienced by lung cancer patients and is challenging for clinical care workers to manage.

METHODS: We performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial to evaluate the clinical effect of acupuncture on CRF in lung cancer patients. Twenty-eight patients presenting with CRF were randomly assigned to active acupuncture or placebo acupuncture groups to receive acupoint stimulation (LI-4, Ren-6, St-36, KI-3, and Sp-6) twice per week for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks of follow-up. The primary outcome was the change in intensity of CFR based on the Chinese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI-C). As the secondary endpoint, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung Cancer Subscale (FACT-LCS) was adopted to assess the influence of acupuncture on patients' quality of life (QOL). Adverse events and safety of treatments were monitored throughout the trial.

RESULTS: Our pilot study demonstrated feasibility among patients with appropriate inclusion criteria and good compliance with acupuncture treatment. A significant reduction in the BFI-C score was observed at 2 weeks in the 14 participants who received active acupuncture compared with those receiving the placebo (P < 0.01). At week 6, symptoms further improved according to the BFI-C (P < 0.001) and the FACT-LCS (P = 0.002). There were no significant differences in the incidence of adverse events in either group (P > 0.05).

CONCLUSION: Fatigue is a common symptom experienced by lung cancer patients. Acupuncture may be a safe and feasible optional method for adjunctive treatment in cancer palliative care, and appropriately powered trials are warranted to evaluate the effects of acupuncture.

 

 

Authors

Lopez G; Liu W; Milbury K; Spelman A; Wei Q; Bruera E; Cohen L.

Title

The effects of oncology massage on symptom self-report for cancer patients and their caregivers.

Source

Supportive Care in Cancer. 25(12):3645-3650, 2017 Dec.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Massage has shown benefit for symptomatic relief in cancer patients and their caregivers. We explored the effects of a single massage session on self-reported symptoms in an outpatient clinic at a comprehensive cancer center.

METHODS: Patients and caregivers receiving oncology massage treatments (30 or 60-min duration) at our Integrative Medicine Center outpatient clinic from September 2012 to January 2015 completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS; 0-10 scale, 10 most severe) pre and post massage. ESAS individual items and subscales of physical distress (PHS), psychological distress (PSS), and global distress (GDS) were analyzed. We used paired t tests with a p value correction (i.e., p < .001) to examine symptoms pre/post massage.

RESULTS: Initial massage visits for 343 patients and 87 caregivers were analyzed. The highest symptom burdens (means) at baseline for patients were sleep 4.22, fatigue 3.57, and pain 2.94; for caregivers, sleep 3.77, well-being 3.01, and pain 2.59. Although patients reported significantly greater global distress and physical symptoms (p < .0001) compared to caregivers at baseline, groups did not differ in regard to psychological symptom burden (p = .66) and individual symptom scores (e.g., pain, sleep, spiritual pain). Massage therapy was associated with statistically (p < .0001) and clinically significant improvements in symptoms of pain, fatigue, anxiety, well-being, and sleep and ESAS subscales for both patients and caregivers. Greater massage duration (30 vs 60 min) did not lead to greater symptom reduction.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients and caregivers reported a moderately high symptom burden. A single massage treatment resulted in acute relief of self-reported symptoms in both groups. Further study is warranted regarding optimal massage dose and frequency.