SIO’s clinical guidelines are referenced in the May 2015 issue of Clinical Digest for Health Professionals of the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). “Complementary and Integrative Approaches for Cancer Symptoms and Treatment Side Effects” provides information on the evidence base on complementary and integrative health approaches for cancer-related symptoms and treatment side effects, citing the clinical guidelines as a resource.  NCCIH Clinical Digest May 2015       

SIO will present three plenary sessions to complement keynotes for the 2015 International Conference November 14-16, in Boston, Massachusetts. Plenary topics will include: relationship-based, patient-centered care, mind-body exercise in cancer care, and mind-body oncology.

The February 19, 2015 issue of Nature Reviews Cancer has published the Society for Integrative Oncology's (SIO) response to the perspectives on oncology authored by David Gorski, MD, "Integrative Oncology: Really the Best of Both Worlds?" which appeared in the September 18, 2014 issue. The SIO response, Integrative Oncology – Strong Science Is Needed for Better Patient Care1, was led by Immediate Past President Heather Greenlee, ND, PhD, and co-authored by President Suzanna Zick, ND, MPH, and Past Presidents David Rosenthal, MD, Lorenzo Cohen, PhD, Barrie Cassileth, PhD and Debu Tripathy, MD.

On February 3, 2015, New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman released results of DNA testing of herbal supplements at major local retail chains. See the AG's announcement.

Over half of Americans consume over 85,000 different supplements, including botanicals, spending $32 billion annually. Attorney General Schneiderman drew inspiration from a 2013 study performed at the University of Guelph in Canada, wherein a third of supplements tested with DNA barcoding did not find traces of the botanical being sold, only fillers. The Attorney General tested store brand bottles of St. John's Wort, ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, valerian, garlic, and saw palmetto at major local chains: Wal-Mart, GNC, Target, and Walgreen Co. Testing of samples using DNA barcoding alone were performed by James Schulte II of Clarkson University in Potsdam, New York. Results indicated that only 21% of the store brand supplements contained DNA fragments of the botanical product sold. Additionally, DNA evidence of rice, beans, wheat, and some unidentified contaminants were found. In response to these findings, Mr. Schneiderman noted that these products should be removed from the stores immediately, with the burden of proof on the industry to demonstrate that botanical products can be validated for authenticity and safety.